GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Moscow Garbage, Mexican Homicide, EU Ideologies

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from May 13 to 19 finds a preview snippet on sensible charts from @albertocairo’s upcoming book “How Charts Lie,” @ladatamx’s report on homicides in Mexico, @RepublikMagazin’s analysis on the changing ideologies of political parties in the European Union, and a recap of the Data Journalism UK conference by @paulbradshaw.

How They Did It: Reporting a UN Murder Cover-Up in the DRC

On November 27, 2018 at 7:30 p.m. Central European Time, five separate media organizations broke similar stories on a United Nations cover-up of the murders of their own staff. It took nothing less than the “radical sharing” of information between these rival platforms to expose a global conspiracy of silence.

How They Did It: Investigating Trafficked Guatemalan Teens in the US

The documentary “Trafficked in America” investigates a labor trafficking scheme targeting Guatemalan teenagers who were smuggled into the United States and forced to work long hours at an egg farm to pay off their smuggling debts. In an interview with Journalist’s Resource, the film’s authors offer insights into the investigative reporting process and the importance of cultural competency in doing high-quality journalism.

Struck by Lightning: A Quick Lesson on Cleaning up Your Data

Being struck by lightning is often used as an example of heavenly retribution because it is so unlikely. Fatalities due to lightning are statistical outliers, since most people struck by lightning survive. So what is the best way to avoid becoming one of these outliers? The following is a step-by-step set of instructions for unpacking a dataset – and being careful about the conclusions we draw.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Weak Passwords, Wolf Drama, Chart Chooser, London vs. England

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from May 6 to 12 finds @SteveFranconeri’s chart chooser based on data formats instead of visualization functions, @daswasfehlt’s examination of Austrian politicians’ weak email passwords in the wake of a major data leak, @NZZ’s look at whether wolves are really a nuisance in Switzerland and @wihbey’s research into the data competence and partisanship of journalists.