“100 Years of Bondage” — Investigating Slavery in the Amazon

For generations, the workers in the Brazilian Amazon who cut the palm straw used for brooms have been functionally enslaved by a system of loans provided by the bosses. Thais Lazzeri, an investigative reporter for Repórter Brasil, had to win their trust as she delved deeply into this topic for her October 2017 article, “100 Years of Bondage” which was beautifully illustrated with photographs by Fernando Martinho.

Human Trafficking and Slavery: A Guide to Resource Materials

Researchers estimate 40 million people exist in some form of slavery today, ranging from debt bondage and false contracts to sex trafficking, forced marriage and child labor. To help journalists cover human trafficking and slavery, GIJN has created this collection of resources including documents and reports, places to find expertise and advice on best practices in reporting and investigation.

Human Trafficking Resources: Best Practices in Reporting

Investigative reporters use a wide variety of skills to cover human trafficking. Sensitive interviewing of victims emerges as vital; a number of useful guides exist on interviewing vulnerable subjects. Meanwhile, getting a handle on sometimes controversial data in this area can be challenging. Collaboration has been critical in doing some stories, which span multiple countries, as some reporters explain post publication. These and other topics are discussed below.

Indonesia’s Tempo Leads Asia into Cross-Border Collaborations

Newsrooms in Asia have traditionally worked alone, guarding their sources and tip-offs fiercely and keeping their stories and investigations in-house. However, after attending GIJN’s Asian Investigative Journalism Conferences and participating in the global Panama Papers investigation, Indonesia’s top newsweekly and leading investigative outlet Tempo have been inspired to pursue their own cross-border collaborations.