Global Shining Light Finalist: The Country with 2,000 Graves (Mexico)

In the run-up to the 2019 Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Hamburg this September 26 to 29, we’re featuring one Global Shining Light Award finalist per day. Check out “The Country With 2,000 Graves,” by the collective “A donde van los desaparecidos” and Quinto Elemento Lab.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Data Complexity, Forking Paths, Post-Brexit

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from August 12 to 18 finds information designer Giorgia Lupi discussing how to embrace data complexity, The New York Times Opinion building a forking path visualization to predict an individual’s political leanings, the Guardian visualizing Brexit’s potential impact on the UK’s food imports, and El Universal Mexico looking at the incidences of crime claiming young victims.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Moscow Garbage, Mexican Homicide, EU Ideologies

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from May 13 to 19 finds a preview snippet on sensible charts from @albertocairo’s upcoming book “How Charts Lie,” @ladatamx’s report on homicides in Mexico, @RepublikMagazin’s analysis on the changing ideologies of political parties in the European Union, and a recap of the Data Journalism UK conference by @paulbradshaw.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Rio’s Militias, OCCRP’s Database and Brexit’s Brits

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from April 2 to 8 finds an alarming piece by @iamdylancurran on how much data Facebook and Google have actually gleaned from us, @OCCRP’s powerful database of public records and leaks, @davidottewell’s take on the evolution of data journalism and an investigation by @TheInterceptBr into the militias in Rio de Janeiro.

How They Did It: Inside a Mega-Collaboration on the US-Mexico Wall

More than 30 journalists set out to film and observe every foot of the border with Mexico, from Texas to California. The result was a fully interactive map with about 20 hours of aerial footage of the border, a seven-chapter story about the journey, 14 additional stories about the consequences of the wall, 14 mini-documentaries and an explanation of the history of the border itself. Here’s how they did it.