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investigation

16 posts

News & Analysis

Beyond Elephants and Rhinos: Tips For Covering Wildlife Trafficking

Wildlife crime doesn’t just impact wildlife, it undermines security, promotes corruption and other illegal cross-border activities, but it remains under-covered. In a session at the GIJC21, a team of experienced wildlife crime journalists explained why more focus should be given to these crimes, and offered tips on how to go beyond the stories on iconic species such as elephants.

Case Studies

Lessons from the Pandora Papers: How to Investigate Financial Crime Stories

From the Pandora Papers to massive “laundromat” exposes, we are witnessing the era of massive leaks exposing financial corruption. But how do you go from a leaked thumb drive to a global exposé of shadowy money? Three of the best sleuths at tracking businesses and investments hidden around the world — who were all part of the Pandora Papers team — offered lessons at GIJC21.

Resource

Investigative Audio: 8 Tips from Podcasting Innovators

In a GIJC21 session on investigative podcasts, journalists and producers who have created award-winning podcasts shared ideas on how to leverage this audio storytelling technique to better connect with the audience and tell impactful stories.

Pandora Papers image 2

Data Journalism

Data Journalism Top 10: Pandora Papers, Data Podcasts, and COVID-19 in Scottish Care Homes

Tracking the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter from September 27 to October 3, we found a series of articles based on discoveries from the Pandora Papers offshore leak. In this edition, we also feature reporting on the damage caused by the eruption of the volcano on La Palma, data journalism podcasts, and a roundup of the German election results.

Forbidden Stories' Pegasus Project exposé

Data Journalism

Data Journalism Top 10: Pegasus, Silencing Reporters, Europe Flooding, Diversity Mapping, K-pop

Our NodeXL mapping from July 12 to 18, which tracks the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter each week, found a series of articles resulting from the collaborative project that analyzed an unprecedented leak of more than 50,000 phone numbers selected for surveillance. In this edition, we also feature an insight into Facebook’s data wars by The New York Times, an interactive piece by Al Jazeera on how the holy city of Mecca has expanded, and a colorful project by the Washington Post on the rise of K-pop.

News & Analysis

Three Investigations that Explored the Devastating Blast that Rocked Beirut

On the evening of August 4, 2020, a devastating blast at the port in Beirut shook the Lebanese capital. It was one of the largest non-nuclear explosions in history. GIJN spoke to three outlets whose investigations all played a pivotal role in understanding what led to the explosion and why a ship and its deadly cargo were stuck at the port for so long.

Reporting Tools & Tips

How We Proved That the Biggest Black Lives Matter Page on Facebook Was Fake

CNN reporter Donie O’Sullivan describes how he and a colleague were able to discover, and then prove, that the largest Black Lives Matter Facebook page in 2018 was an Australia-based scam. O’Sullivan also provides insights into the value of good archive sites and domain registration tools in investigating suspicious social media pages, in conjunction with traditional reporting methods.

News & Analysis

How Forensic Architecture Supports Journalists with Complex Investigative Techniques

Since it was founded in 2010, Forensic Architecture has “hacked into the source code” of architecture to produce innovative and ground-breaking investigations that use 3D modelling, data mining, machine learning, and audio analysis. Working like a lab for the development of new tools, the outfit uses many of the forensic methods of investigation that have historically been the preserve of law enforcement to investigate social and political topics and injustices.

How They Did It News & Analysis

How They Did It: Feminist Investigators Go Undercover to Expose Abortion Misinformation

A network of female journalists went undercover in order to investigate what women and girls around the world are told when they approach a crisis pregnancy organization. Some were told they could be killing the next president, others than abortions cause cancer. The investigation revealed the highly sophisticated tactics some centers use to break a woman’s resolve, and how the messaging can be traced back to a Christian charity based in Columbus, Ohio.