Data Journalism Top 10: Ramadan Fasting, Volcanic Eruptions, Climate Change Economics, China’s Forced Labor

Driving an electric car and buying solar panels are things individuals can do to help slow climate change. But according to a new study, most people don’t realize that achieving a real impact on greenhouse emissions requires significant lifestyle sacrifices. Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from April 12 to April 18 found a story by the Financial Times showing that the best way in individual can reduce their carbon footprint is to have one less child. We also feature an explainer of Ramadan fasting by Al Jazeera, a look into China’s polysilicon factories by Bloomberg, and Chinese tycoon Jack Ma’s jet-setting ways.

Most Popular Resources on GIJN in 2019

GIJN’s ever-growing Resource Center added many new or substantially revamped guides this year, including packages on climate change, land ownership, women journalists, data journalism, tracking planes, and working with whistleblowers.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Visualizing Philosophy, El Salvador’s Violence, the UK’s John Bercow, Mexican Bikes, and Russian Data

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from October 28 to November 3 finds The Economist’s summary of a great year in print data journalism, an interesting visualization by Deniz Cem Önduygu of key arguments in Western philosophy, Datajournalism.com’s guide to editing data journalism, and BBC News’ analysis of outgoing House of Commons Speaker John Bercow’s career in numbers.

My Favorite Tools: Emmanuel Freudenthal

For the very first story in our new series about journalists’ favorite tools, we spoke with Emmanuel Freudenthal, a freelance investigative reporter based in Nairobi. He told GIJN’s Gaelle Faure all about how he uses virtual tools like GPS Tracks and Gmail Snooze and physical tools like plane-tracking antennas and good old motorbikes.

How They Did It: A Private Yacht, a Luxury Jet and Hungary’s Governing Elite

In the hot summer of 2018, Hungary’s Atlatszo tracked two luxury vehicles – a private plane and a yacht – that the Hungarian government elite, including Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and his closest allies, used to travel to business meetings, football games and vacations abroad. Here’s how they did it.