GIJN Webinar — Investigating the Pandemic: Masterclass on Online Research with Paul Myers

Reporting on the ground and interviewing people face-to-face have become high-risk activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. But there are ways to continue investigative work using your computer and cutting-edge online techniques – critical skills at all times. Join us for this GIJN webinar, Online Research with open source sleuth Paul Myers, part of GIJN’s series Investigating the Pandemic. 

How to Become a Deep Web Super Sleuth

Search engines only show a small fraction of the content that is actually available online. Leonie Kijewski highlights four tips on finding databases that can give you all the info that Google won’t, based on journalist Albrecht Ude’s presentation at the recent Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Hamburg.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: DRC’s Election Fraud, San Francisco’s Interactive Art, Ultimate Data Viz List

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 14 to 20 finds a @FinancialTimes exposé of possible electoral fraud in Congo, @sxywu’s beautiful visualization of interaction data between a museum and the public, and @maartenzam’s the ultimate data visualization list to end all lists.

Online Methods to Investigate the Who, Where, and When of a Person

Online research is often a challenge for traditional investigative reporters, journalism lecturers and students. Information from the web can be fake, biased, incomplete or all of the above. Offline, too, there is no happy hunting ground with unbiased people or completely honest governments. In the end, it all boils down to asking the right questions, digital or not. This chapter gives you some strategic advice and tools for digitizing three of the biggest questions in journalism: who, where and when?