GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Lying Charts, Flu Tracker, Soaring Alcohol Costs, Taxing Football

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from February 25 to March 3 finds a @nytimes profile of its much admired data editor @amandacox; a flu tracker by @morgenpost; and a double dose of skepticism in @amandabee’s roundup of bad data interpretations and @albertocairo’s “How Charts Lie” book.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: FT’s Chart Quiz, 65 Years of Human Rights Data, Build a Brexit Voter

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from February 18 to 24 finds a fun @FinancialTimes quiz that tests your ability to read charts, the creation of a @DataVizSociety to foster engagement in the data visualization community and data viz designer @fedfragapane’s analysis of Human Rights Protection data from 1950 to 2014.

Where Do ProPublica’s Investigative Reporters Find Their Story Ideas?

A reader asked ProPublica Illinois how the media organization finds new story ideas. Reporter Jodi S. Cohen, who was just as curious as the reader, spoke to her colleagues to find out where they got their inspiration. From fleshing out ideas found in other colleagues’ stories to digging into data anomalies, and even paying extra attention to an idle truck parked at an abandoned gas station, their answers show that there are a myriad of ways in which inspiration for your next big story could strike.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Mapping Cholera, Tracking Trump and Canada’s Data Gaps

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 28 to February 3 finds @sciam highlighting a curious case of mapping cholera, @nbarrowman arguing that raw data is not as perfectly objective as imagined, @bbc tracking Trump’s performance, and @VismeApp compiling a list of the best data visualizations on climate change.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Visualizing the 2018 News Cycle, the History of Football and Sacked Coaches

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 21 to 27 finds @schemadesign and @GoogleTrends teaming up to visualize news cycles in 2018, the @washingtonpost’s flyover tour of the entire US-Mexico border and two interesting football-related visualizations: @ftblsm’s history of football and @NZZ’s analysis of whether football coaches Jose Mourinho and Julen Lopetegui should have been sacked.

Editor’s Pick: Best Investigative Stories from Mainland China in 2018

Chinese journalists have broken stories this year on medical abuses, #MeToo and the environment, leading to government prosecution, consumer uproar and boycott, and disciplinary actions. Here are some of the best investigative journalism work in China in 2018, nominated by practicing Chinese journalists and media professionals, and selected by the GIJN Chinese team.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: German Heat, Austrian Arms, Quebec School Fees and Salvadoran Kidney Disease

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from Sept 3 to 9 finds @FiveThirtyEight attacked by the green-eyed monster with their equivalent of Bloomberg’s “Jealousy List,” @daswasfehlt breaks down Austria’s export of arms, @GoogleAI announces the beta launch of Google Datasets Search, and @SZ documents how climate change is wreaking havoc on temperatures in Germany but boosting ice-cream sales.

Two Million Dead in 2013: The HIV/AIDS Story Today

When a story on a particular topic is told over and over again, it leads to what is known as media fatigue—a situation where journalists and editors find the topic no longer newsworthy. However, the worst is when audiences become fatigued—when general readers are fed up with the subject as well. This problem is one that bedevils HIV/AIDS reporting despite the fact that many people—especially the affected and the infected—still want to learn more.