Covering the Climate Crisis

From the tropics to the Arctic, Indigenous peoples are on the front lines of the climate crisis. Investigative reporting is critical to tell their stories, delve into the causes and effects of global warming, and examine mitigation strategies. Indigenous communities worldwide are witnessing the impacts of warmer temperatures. They are also part of the solution.“Western scientific evidence is now saying what our Indigenous peoples have been expressing for a long time: Life as we know it is in danger,” said Tom Goldtooth, executive director of the US-based Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN) and an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation, in a 2019 Truthout article. Indigenous communities worldwide are witnessing the impacts of warmer temperatures.

Climate Crisis: Ideas for Investigative Journalists

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This GIJN resource page aims to encourage more investigative reporting about the climate crisis. In Part 1, we begin with articles that provide concrete suggestions for investigative projects. In Part 2, we have collected challenging commentaries on how the media has handled climate change and what it should be doing better. In Part 3, we provide links to some useful resources aimed at journalists. We welcome suggestions for expanding this resource.

New on GIJN: Resources for Finding and Using Satellite Imagery

Satellite are being used by journalists to report on conflicts, climate change, refugees, forest fires, illegal mining, oil spills, deforestation, slavery and many other topics. GIJN’s resource page provides official sources for free satellite images and links to experts who can advise on finding images, using them, handling technical issues and more.