Exposing How US Universities Profited from Indigenous Land

A joint investigation by a historian and a journalist revealed that a number of US universities were beneficiaries from land expropriated from Indigenous communities. The authors, Robert Lee and Tristan Ahtone, reveal what tools helped them uncover the story. They built a geodatabase and traced the money to find out where the land had come from and how much was paid for it.

Using a Mobile Phone Survey to Investigate South Sudan’s Conflict

In South Sudan, conflict and government repression make it difficult to do on-the-ground reporting, so a team of journalists designed a mobile phone survey to gather data on forced displacement and destruction across the country. Carolyn Thompson explains why their award-winning investigation may offer lessons to others working in repressive environments or facing movement restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Exposing Chaos and Repression in Wuhan with User-Generated Content

An Australian documentary team used user-generated footage to create a film about Wuhan, the city at the epicenter of China’s COVID-19 outbreak. They used clips filmed on mobile phones that showed people with the virus being dragged into vans by police, and bodies left on the street and on hospital floors, using different tools to verify the material.

Yemen’s Dirty War: A Q&A with Pulitzer Winner Maggie Michael

Yemen has been embroiled in civil war for decades. But its current conflict has left 100,000 dead, with hundreds of thousands more displaced. While the war has received limited coverage by most international and mainstream media outlets, during 2018 and 2019 a team of Associated Press journalists spent months investigating Yemen’s Dirty War. Maggie Michael, Nariman El-Mofty, and Maad al-Zekri won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting. GIJN’s Majdolin Hasan spoke with Michael about how they did it.

How They Did It: Exposing Right-Wing Radicalization on YouTube

To investigate radicalization on YouTube, journalists from two Dutch media outlets teamed up and examined 600,000 videos, 120 million comments, and 20 million automatically-generated recommendations —using software they wrote for this occasion. Dimitri Tokmetzis, who runs the data desk at De Correspondent, wrote about how they did it for GIJN.