Making Investigative Journalism Sustainable: Mohamed Nanabhay

As part of GIJN’s new series, Making Investigative Journalism Sustainable: Best Business Practices, we are featuring a set of key tips from 10 leading journalists and experts from around the world who are either working to build viable organizations around investigative journalism or work as experts to support these enterprises. Here is Mohamed Nanabhay, Deputy CEO, Media Development Investment Fund (South Africa)

See videos from all 10 experts here. Also, check GIJN’s Resource Center sections on sustainability and fundraising to find useful tips and tools, and case studies on all the issues and more covered here. GIJN will continue to expand its work in this area and we welcome suggestions, feedback, and support. Please contact us at hello@gijn.org.

What is the Commercial Model for Investigative Media?

Journalism has been mired in an economic crisis for years, prompting journalists to find new models of funding, and to experiment, innovate, and learn from one another. Some nonprofit organizations are raising funds through a range of commercial activities. GIJN’s latest Resource Center addition, written by Ross Settles from the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the Hong Kong University, is designed to help journalists navigate the complex field of commercial revenue.

How to Evaluate Commercial Revenue as a Sustainability Strategy for Investigative Media Organizations

中文

Introduction: The Three Main Commercial Revenue Strategies
Nonprofit investigative journalism organizations are increasingly borrowing strategies from larger commercial publishers to supplement their grant funding and to extend their impact. While membership and subscription strategies are focused on your consumers, commercial revenue strategies mean making deals with other institutions. There are three broad categories of commercial revenue strategies, each defined by what is being sold. Advertising: Selling marketers and advertising agencies access to your audience. Syndication: Selling other publishers access to your reporting or other internal data/information.

Prospecting and Cultivation: A Fundraising Primer

Русский | Français

By Bridget Gallagher

Growing your major gifts program — or getting one started in the first place — can feel like an overwhelming responsibility. The philanthropic landscape is extremely competitive, and the prospect of identifying and soliciting prospective donors can seem cumbersome and intimidating. While the non-profit journalism landscape has flourished, opening up new revenue streams and business models to support mission-driven news, many organizations continue to rely on major gifts from foundations, high net-worth individuals, governments and multilateral organizations for the large investments they need to start up, survive and thrive. The competition for major gifts is intense. The journalism sector has grown robustly in the last several years, which means you are competing with an increasing number of organizations.

Engagement or Reach: How To Best Find Our Audience

At a recent meeting of the Institute for Nonprofit News – for my sins, I now sit on INN’s board – we learned an interesting statistic: About half the organization’s members have a strategy to drive readers to their own sites/destinations, and the other half count on distributing their content via other platforms. Does it matter how we reach readers? And should we care?