GIJN’s Top Reads for 2017

It’s been a year of great reads on GIJN, from “how they did it” to the best tips and tools on everything from mojo to mapping. Here’s a curated list of top ten reader favorites from stories published in 2017.

How They Did It: ProPublica’s Engagement Journalism

There is power in a crowd, and harnessing crowd contributions have become increasingly useful in investigative journalism. New York-based ProPublica shows how newsrooms are integrating crowdsourcing as a routine reporting tool, using it for data collection and to connect with and gather personal stories from readers.

Top Ten #ddj: The Week’s Most Popular Data Journalism Links

Here are top data journalism tweets for Apr 24-30, per our NodeXL mapping: draw it yourself interactives (@br_data); visualizing Google searches (@albertocairo); opinion polls analysis (@SZ); Politibot’s graphics (@politibot); French election (@BIQdata); ProPublica jobs (@ProPublica); and more.

GIJN Members in the News

It’s been a busy first quarter of 2017 for GIJN members — from picking up Pulitzer Prizes to launching crowdfunding campaigns. There have also been new projects and new collaborations forged. Here are some noteworthy splashes made by GIJN members around the world.

Great Journalism of 2016

This is a list of winning stories drawn from 16 major global or regional journalism awards given in 2016, which hopefully might serve as a source of inspiration for you to find original stories, to innovate in how to tell them, or to find a thread to develop a fresh angle. Take heart that the quality of work by solo reporters or fledgling investigative teams can sometimes stand out as much as that of huge media outlets.

Peer Reviewing Our Data Stories

As journalists who analyze data for stories, we strive to hold ourselves accountable to a high standard of accuracy. But checking our work is rarely a straightforward process. Newsroom editors and fact-checkers might not have enough data expertise. Often, we need an outside opinion. Ideally, we could ask each other for advice, or even turn to experts in other fields for help. In academia, asking for outside comment before publication is broadly referred to as “peer review.”

Seven Things You Need To Know about Non-Profit Journalism

There is a silent crisis afflicting our democracy: the implosion of journalism as we have known it. Its most obvious symptom is the tens of thousands of journalists who have lost their jobs in the last decade. Those jobs were never refilled. Economists may call this destruction of traditional journalism “creative” but it is nothing less than a pressing matter of national security.