GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: New Tools for Chartmaking and Sonification, 3D Data, Hedgehog Maps, Editable Spreadsheet Images

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from March 4 to 10 finds several interesting tools and feature releases: @FinancialTimes’ chartmaking tool, @datavized’s data sonification tool and a new feature on @Microsoft’s Excel app that converts printed tables into editable spreadsheets, as well as @alice_corona’s discussion of building 3D data experiences, and @alyssafowers coining the term “hedgehog maps.”

This Week’s Top 10 in Data Journalism

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from February 19 to 25 finds economist @SethS_D analyzing Spotify data to find the correlation between our birth year and our music influences, @infowetrust illustrates three centuries of iconic infographics in a beautiful 17th century-styled dataviz and @EdjNet’s Stats Monitor gives you #ddj news leads on European data.

This Week’s Top Ten in Data Journalism

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from September 25 to October 1 has @FT mapping the route in a day of a London Uber driver, #NICAR18 registration opening up, @Lattif charting Africa’s internet shutdowns using @atlascharts and loads of German election data visualizations.

Peer Reviewing Our Data Stories

As journalists who analyze data for stories, we strive to hold ourselves accountable to a high standard of accuracy. But checking our work is rarely a straightforward process. Newsroom editors and fact-checkers might not have enough data expertise. Often, we need an outside opinion. Ideally, we could ask each other for advice, or even turn to experts in other fields for help. In academia, asking for outside comment before publication is broadly referred to as “peer review.”

Data Journalists from 20 Countries Gather for Cutting-Edge NICAR14

A record 950 journalists, data experts, and students from 20 countries gathered last weekend for NICAR14, the annual data journalism conference organized by Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE). The five-day gathering, twice the size of last year’s conference, has tripled in size over the past five years.