Where Do ProPublica’s Investigative Reporters Find Their Story Ideas?

A reader asked ProPublica Illinois how the media organization finds new story ideas. Reporter Jodi S. Cohen, who was just as curious as the reader, spoke to her colleagues to find out where they got their inspiration. From fleshing out ideas found in other colleagues’ stories to digging into data anomalies, and even paying extra attention to an idle truck parked at an abandoned gas station, their answers show that there are a myriad of ways in which inspiration for your next big story could strike.

Making an Impact: Here’s How to Take Your Story to the Next Level

Measuring the impact of journalism can help newsrooms reconnect with its audience and attract new funders. But the wider journalism ecosystem has yet to embrace the concept of keeping track of journalism’s impact. Impact Makers Bernadette Kuiper talks to the European Journalism Centre about why journalists should care about impact, how to create it and where to draw the line between journalism and advocacy.

How They Did It: Inside a Mega-Collaboration on the US-Mexico Wall

More than 30 journalists set out to film and observe every foot of the border with Mexico, from Texas to California. The result was a fully interactive map with about 20 hours of aerial footage of the border, a seven-chapter story about the journey, 14 additional stories about the consequences of the wall, 14 mini-documentaries and an explanation of the history of the border itself. Here’s how they did it.

Tips for Working in Kuwait

Full guide here. العربية

Media Environment
Freedom of speech in Kuwait is protected according to Articles 36 and 37 in the country’s constitution. However, that freedom is limited according to what is “specified by the law.”

Criticizing the Emir of Kuwait is illegal and could lead to more than five years in prison, physical abuse, extreme interrogation or badeportation. It is also illegal to publish work that insults Islam, the prophets or God. Publishing work that discusses them negatively could lead to more than a $50,000 fine and a year (or more) in prison.

This Week’s Top 10 in Data Journalism

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from February 5 to 11 finds @flowingdata’s tips to visualizing missing or incomplete data, statistics of women’s challenges in journalism by @abraji and @generonumero and a cool income inequality interactive by @EconomicPolicy.

How to Make Audiences Love Good Journalism

Changing the way accountability stories are written takes research, preparation, listening and even a bit of psychology. In an excerpt from from a recent American Press Institute report, here are some recommendations from experts about persuasion and communications — as well as examples from news organizations that are using non-narrative, data and visual elements to make the best of journalism better for audiences.