Here’s Why Investigative Reporters Need to Know Knowledge Graphs

Across the data science community, knowledge graphs have become a growing phenomenon in recent years, driving many applications including virtual assistants like Siri and Alexa. Friedrich Lindenberg, from the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, writes about how its data platform Aleph makes use of knowledge graphs to help investigative reporters analyze and cross-reference data.

What We’re Reading: F@%# the Pulitzer, Tough Questions for “Plandemic”, and the Ethics of Showing Your Work Pre-Pub

This week’s Friday 5, where we round up our favorite reads from around the online world in English, includes Meduza’s report on Russian editor Roman Badanin’s Pulitzer-charged rant against The New York Times, ProPublica’s sober response to the “Plandemic” viral video, and Poynter’s point about an ethics policy that includes guidelines for pre-publication source review.

What We’re Reading: Google Mobility Reports, Pegasus Spyware for Virus Tracking, Justice for Jan Kuciak, COVID Corruption

This week’s Friday 5, where we round up our favorite reads from around the online world in English, includes the launch of Google’s Community Mobility Reports that track social distancing trends in 131 countries, how the group behind Pegasus spyware created software for COVID-19, and news that the man who murdered investigative journalist Jan Kuciak was sentenced to 23 years in prison.

How to Become a Deep Web Super Sleuth

Search engines only show a small fraction of the content that is actually available online. Leonie Kijewski highlights four tips on finding databases that can give you all the info that Google won’t, based on journalist Albrecht Ude’s presentation at the recent Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Hamburg.

Online Research Tools

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Online Research Tools and Investigative Techniques by the BBC’s ace online sleuth Paul Myers has long been a starting point for online research by GIJN readers. His website, Research Clinic, is rich in research links and “study materials.” Here’s a tipsheet about finding people online that Myers presented at a 2019 GIJN webinar. And a GIJN article about his presentation at GIJC19, 4 Questions for Online Super-Sleuth Paul Myers. https://gijn.org/2019/06/05/finding-people-online-a-tipsheet-from-paul-myers/

See also Myers’ other guides on gijn.org:

For our companion video, “Online Searches And Key Databases,” check GIJN’s YouTube channel. Using Twitter to Find People at the Scene of a Breaking Story
Customise your Browser: Using Add-ons for your Web Research
Browser Add-ons (Part 2): Traveling Back in Time
GIJN’s Investigative Toolbox, a column by GIJN’s Alastair Otter, explores selected topics:
Tracking Names and Websites, Verifying Video, a Clustering Search Engine
Digging for People, Trawling the Web and Keeping Yourself Safe
Backgrounding People and Companies
Mine Twitter and Monitor Website Updates
Beyond Spreadsheets and Deep Searching the Web
Jake Creps keeps up a steady stream of useful tips on his blog.