Lições da pandemia: investigando saúde e indústria farmacêutica

Durante a pandemia COVID-19, jornalistas de todo o mundo foram repentinamente lançados na área de saúde pública, tentando entender as alegações conflitantes e uma ciência que parecia mudar a cada dia. Uma sessão da #GIJC21 conduziu os repórteres através da pandemia da COVID-19, oferecendo dicas sobre como cobrir o desenvolvimento de medicamentos e os processos de aprovação, avaliar estudos científicos, investigar conflitos de interesse e expor fraudes e corrupção.

Lessons from the Pandemic: COVID-19 and Health-Pharma Investigations

During the COVID-19 pandemic, journalists worldwide were suddenly thrown into the public health beat, trying to make sense of competing claims, and a science that seemed to change by the day. A session at the GIJC21 walked reporters through the COVID-19 pandemic, offering tips on covering the drug development and approval processes, evaluating scientific studies, unearthing conflicts of interest, and exposing fraud and malpractice.

Data Journalism Top 10: Breaking into Data Journalism, America’s 5G Fail, Thai Pop, Gender Bias, Fake Google Reviews

We often talk about climate change as an issue future generations will confront. But society is already feeling the dangerous impact of rising temperatures as more and more regions around the world slowly become unlivable. The Guardian produced an ambitious data project on this issue as well as another piece examining the shifting carbon center of gravity. The most popular data journalism tweets between October 11-17, as discovered by our NodeXL mapping and human curation, also include stories on the long-expected arrival of 5G technology, the rise of Thai pop, and fake reviews on Google Maps.

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Data Journalism Top 10: Pandora Papers, Data Podcasts, and COVID-19 in Scottish Care Homes

Tracking the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter from September 27 to October 3, we found a series of articles based on discoveries from the Pandora Papers offshore leak. In this edition, we also feature reporting on the damage caused by the eruption of the volcano on La Palma, data journalism podcasts, and a roundup of the German election results.

Data Journalism Top 10: Fading Immunity, Women Losing Work, Myanmar Murders, Teen Pregnancy, Britain’s Wealth Gap

Tracking some of the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter from August 23 to 29, we found a thread by Financial Times journalist John Burn-Murdoch exploring what we know so far about the long-term effects of immunizations, a look into the pandemic’s impact on the global female workforce by The Washington Post, and an investigation into teen pregnancies in Peru by OjoPúblico.

Forbidden Stories' Pegasus Project exposé

Data Journalism Top 10: Pegasus, Silencing Reporters, Europe Flooding, Diversity Mapping, K-pop

Our NodeXL mapping from July 12 to 18, which tracks the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter each week, found a series of articles resulting from the collaborative project that analyzed an unprecedented leak of more than 50,000 phone numbers selected for surveillance. In this edition, we also feature an insight into Facebook’s data wars by The New York Times, an interactive piece by Al Jazeera on how the holy city of Mecca has expanded, and a colorful project by the Washington Post on the rise of K-pop.

Data Journalism Top 10: Hot Dogs, Ransomware, Earth’s Hottest Places, Miami Building Collapse, Bezos Empire

High vaccination rates in some parts of the world are helping to curb the spread of COVID-19 and allowing communities to resume normal life. But vaccinations can also give a false sense of security, with new variants threatening to prolong the pandemic. Our NodeXL mapping from June 28 to July 4, found Portuguese newspaper Público creating a tool to help readers find out what activities they can do after getting the vaccine at minimal risk. In this edition, we also take a look at a piece examining forest fires in Mexico, an analysis of the worst cyberattacks by Bloomberg, and a lively data-driven essay on same-gender lyrics by The Pudding.

Cómo las salas de redacción sin fines de lucro fueron pioneras en cubrir a profundidad temas de salud

Cuando la pandemia de COVID-19 empezó, los editores se apresuraron a reunir equipos para cubrir la crisis. Un paso adelante estaban los medios que ya se dedicaban a investigar la salud como un tema que sabía cómo generar y construir redes de expertos en salud pública y vacunas y, lo que es más importante, cómo investigar tanto la ciencia como la política detrás de la respuesta a la pandemia.

Data Journalism Top 10: Tulsa Race Massacre, Canada’s Prison Bias, Colombia’s Police Violence, Football’s Big Money, Europe’s Lobbyists, Battling Misinformation

For inmates in Canada, risk assessments can determine which type of prison they are sent to and their chances of successfully reentering society. But an investigation by The Globe and Mail revealed that these assessments are biased against Indigenous and Black inmates. Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from May 24 to 30 also found an interactive project by The New York Times recreating the Black neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma destroyed in 1921, and data-driven reporting on the influence of big money in soccer, the cost of Italy’s vaccination campaign, and police violence during the recent protests in Colombia.

How Nonprofit Newsrooms Pioneered In-Depth Healthcare Coverage Before the Pandemic

When the COVID-19 pandemic took hold last year, editors scrambled to rapidly assemble teams to cover the crisis. Steps ahead were the outlets already dedicated to investigating health as a subject who knew how to source and build networks of public health and vaccine experts, and crucially, how to investigate both the science and the politics behind the pandemic response.