New Models: How Academics, Nonprofit News and Government are Collaborating

The Global Reporting Centre has launched an ambitious project investigating labor abuse, environmental impact and corruption in global commerce. Here’s the Centre’s Peter W Klein on how Hidden Costs will bring together award-winning journalists, scholars and major media organizations — including the New York Times, PBS Frontline, the Toronto Star, Smithsonian Channel, NBC News, DigitalGlobe and Google News Labs — to undertake investigative-reporting projects.

Document of the Day: Reuters Institute Digital News Report 2018

The Reuters Institute surveyed 74,000 people in 37 countries to find out how consumers around the world are using digital news. The findings are included in its 2018 Digital News Report, revealing insights about digital news consumption that could help inform newsrooms on their digital news strategies. The report focuses on the issues of misinformation, new business models, rise of messaging apps and new audio growth.

How #MeToo China Inspired a User-Generated Model of Investigative Journalism

As the Chinese Communist Party tightens its grip on the news media, investigative journalism has suffered a heavy toll, disappearing from China’s newsrooms. But the recent outpouring of #MeToo reporting in China has signaled the emergence of a new genre of investigative journalism. One that is marked by a wave of user-generated content, with professional journalists serving as aggregators and fact-checkers, in addition to performing traditional reporting tasks such as deep reporting and writing.  

How to Start Your Own Media Newsletter

Your newsletter mailing list is made up of real people who have allowed you into some of the most prime real estate in the world: their inbox, and this privilege should not be abused. Splice Newsroom offers their tips to offer your subscribers quality content.

The Dirty Words Journalists Have to Say Without Blushing

Customer, profits, monetize. These are just some of the words that make journalists cringe because they sound so dirty when associated with our ethically-produced investigative journalism. But university professor James Breiner argues that journalists and the media need to add these words to their vocabulary without feeling squeamish.

What a Failed Media Startup Can Teach Us About Involving Readers in Reporting

Canada’s OpenFile had an elegant concept. They would ask readers to tell them what they thought was important and make editorial decisions around that. But the platform’s initial success couldn’t be sustained as it struggled to make money and maintain the flow of reader-suggested stories. Here’s what the OpenFile journalists learned about community journalism along the way.