GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Mapping Cholera, Tracking Trump and Canada’s Data Gaps

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 28 to February 3 finds @sciam highlighting a curious case of mapping cholera, @nbarrowman arguing that raw data is not as perfectly objective as imagined, @bbc tracking Trump’s performance, and @VismeApp compiling a list of the best data visualizations on climate change.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Visualizing the 2018 News Cycle, the History of Football and Sacked Coaches

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 21 to 27 finds @schemadesign and @GoogleTrends teaming up to visualize news cycles in 2018, the @washingtonpost’s flyover tour of the entire US-Mexico border and two interesting football-related visualizations: @ftblsm’s history of football and @NZZ’s analysis of whether football coaches Jose Mourinho and Julen Lopetegui should have been sacked.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: DRC’s Election Fraud, San Francisco’s Interactive Art, Ultimate Data Viz List

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 14 to 20 finds a @FinancialTimes exposé of possible electoral fraud in Congo, @sxywu’s beautiful visualization of interaction data between a museum and the public, and @maartenzam’s the ultimate data visualization list to end all lists.

What the Experts Expect for Data Journalism in 2019

With the global spread of data journalism, the advent of artificial intelligence and the increasing use of big data moving alongside a rapid rise of disinformation, GIJN asked data journalism experts around the world what they anticipate for 2019. Here are their thoughts on the major trends, ideas and technologies that will affect how we do our jobs.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Pirates vs. Princesses, Buenos Aires Crime, Awards & Fellowships

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from January 7 to 13, 2019 finds @SZ’s analysis revealing how children’s books perpetuate gender stereotypes, @A24COM mapping the hottest crime spots and times in Buenos Aires, @dw_akademie offering a data journalism fellowship opportunity, and great chances to win awards from @WorldGovSummit and @GENinnovate’s Data Journalism Awards.

Document of the Day: Visual Vocabulary

Inspired by the Graphic Continuum by Jon Schwabish and Severino Ribeca, the Financial Times graphic team came up with their own neat chart of visualizations. The Visual Vocabulary is a guide to help journalists pick the right type of visualization for their story.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: El Salvador’s Corpses, Searching for Women, Merging Data

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from December 31, 2018 to Jan 6, 2019 finds experts sharing their thoughts on machine learning in journalism with @storybench, @funkeinterativ and @webk1d’s useful tool to merge datasets, @pewresearch’s overview of female under-representation in online image searches, and an analysis by @EDNNews on corpses bodies sent back to El Salvador.

The 25 Best Data Visualizations of 2018

Over the last few years, data and data analysis have taken on a new quality. Data and information is now a tool for creating beautiful visuals. What used to be simple charts and scatter plots are now complex and creative pieces of data art — some beautiful enough to hang up on your wall. Visme picked a collection of the best data visualizations of 2018.

GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10 in 2018: Visual Vocabulary, Eclectic Visualization, Google Dataset Search, Laughing in Parliament

It’s been a great year for data journalism and visualizations. GIJN’s Top 10 #ddj series captured snapshots of what’s popular on Twitter among the global data journalism community for 46 weeks in 2018. For this edition, we asked NodeXL to map 2018’s most popular #ddj tweets from January 1 to December 11 and the results are in. This year’s most popular tweets include @FinancialTimes’ ever-popular Visual Vocabulary chart, @Google’s Dataset Search, @hnrklndbrg’s eclectic visualizations, and @SZ’s analysis of Germany’s parliamentarians using laughter as a debate weapon.