GIJN’s Data Journalism Top 10: Air Pollution, China Cables, #29Leaks, Predators on Dating Apps

What’s the global data journalism community tweeting about this week? Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from December 2 to 8 finds The New York Times visualizing particle pollution in augmented reality; various media outlets investigating #29Leaks, a global reporting project based on a massive data leak from an offshore services provider; Columbia Journalism Investigations and ProPublica digging into the problem of sexual predators lurking in dating apps; and The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists breaking down the significance of the China Cables.

How They Did It: Inside a Mega-Collaboration on the US-Mexico Wall

More than 30 journalists set out to film and observe every foot of the border with Mexico, from Texas to California. The result was a fully interactive map with about 20 hours of aerial footage of the border, a seven-chapter story about the journey, 14 additional stories about the consequences of the wall, 14 mini-documentaries and an explanation of the history of the border itself. Here’s how they did it.

New Tools Open Up Virtual Reality to Journalists

When Gustavo Cerati, a legendary Argentinian musician and songwriter, was asked to share his best advice for new musicians, he refused—saying instead that “experiences are not transferable.” You may agree or may not with his statement, but if you’ve ever worn an Oculus Rift or a similar virtual reality (VR) headset, you’ll know we are getting closer and closer to transferable experiences.