Job Opening: Training Director

Position: Training Director, Global Investigative Journalism Network

Deadline: June 30, 2018

GIJN, a fast-growing nonprofit, is looking for a top-notch trainer in investigative and data journalism to help our members and partners around the world. This position involves heavy international travel, building up capacity among journalists in Africa, Asia, Latin America and worldwide. You’ll be part of our extraordinary multicultural team based in seven countries. You’ll work in a collaborative network that is having impact every day on the front lines of journalism. Among the duties:

Speak and run trainings at conferences of investigative journalists;
Organize and conduct workshops on investigative and data journalism;
Assist in answering queries to GIJN’s busy Help Desk;
Assist in building GIJN’s multilingual Resource Center;

Skills Required:

Fluency in basic tools of data journalism, including spreadsheets, database management, and mapping;
Effective public speaking and teaching
Experience as a reporter or editor in investigative reporting projects.

GIJN Boosts Broadcast Journalists in Thailand

GIJN lent a hand to the Thai Broadcast Journalists Association last month, helping train 60 journalists in the fine art of muckraking in Thailand. “The ending workshop was quite amazing,” Hanson says. “They worked with an intensity that was really impressive, developing story ideas they had generated the first day… “I believe some of these stories will be published!”

Thoughts from a Journalism Trainer

For the past seven and one-half years, I have spent large portions of each year doing media-development work–most of it training of journalists or journalism students–in four countries of sub-Saharan Africa, and in Ukraine and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Inevitably, my own experiences and observations about what works and what doesn’t, and what is really important in this work, have passed through my mind while researching and writing this report. None of them is unique, but it may be useful to list what I consider my three strongest lessons from nearly a dozen different training projects.