Data Journalism on Indigenous Communities

The absence or poor quality of data on Indigenous communities presents both challenges and opportunities for data journalism. Because it is widely recognized that official data on Indigenous communities is faulty or sparse, reporters may need to look for alternative sources, or even create it themselves. Although data journalism commonly refers to the use of existing data, it also can mean filling a data void. Creating data is more work, but the results can be impressive, unique, and highly impactful. This GIJN/NAJA guide will:

Look at some of the issues concerning the available data on Indigenous people
Discuss alternative sources of data
Provide information on learning about data journalism
Review data journalism tools
Suggest some of the official places to look for data

Problems with National Data
Complaints about the data on Indigenous peoples are similar around the world.

GIJN/NAJA Guide for Indigenous Investigative Journalists

This guide is created to encourage Indigenous investigative journalists and to provide empowering tips and tools. Developed collaboratively by the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) and the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA), the guide explores eight key topics. The entries include background information, examples of investigative work, suggestions for stories, and resources for information. The chapters include:

Data Journalism on Indigenous Communities
Land Ownership: Community Rights Under Threat
Investigating Criminal Justice
Exposing Exploitation and Corruption
Covering the Climate Crisis
Investigating Murdered or Missing Persons
Indigenous Data Sovereignty
Getting Documents, Dealing with Whistleblowers, and Staying Safe

In conjunction with the introduction of this guide, a training/networking program is being held for Indigenous journalists from eight countries at the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Hamburg, Germany, September 26-29, 2019. This guide was written by GIJN Resource Center Director Toby McIntosh.

My Favorite Tools: Fabiola Torres

For our series about journalists’ favorite tools, we spoke with Fabiola Torres of Salud Con Lupa. She told GIJN’s Gaelle Faure all about the tools that help her carry out cross-border investigations into public health, including tools to find data as well as to analyze and visualize it.

Six Lessons From Reporting “Heartbroken”

Every investigative journalist encounters moments of doubt. Neil Bedi, an investigative reporter at the Tampa Bay Times, shares the set of rules his team followed to survive the toughest reporting challenges while reporting their Pulitzer-nominated series “Heartbroken.”