GIJN/NAJA Guide for Indigenous Investigative Journalists

This guide is created to encourage Indigenous investigative journalists and to provide empowering tips and tools. Developed collaboratively by the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) and the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA), the guide explores eight key topics. The entries include background information, examples of investigative work, suggestions for stories, and resources for information. The chapters include:

Data Journalism on Indigenous Communities
Land Ownership: Community Rights Under Threat
Investigating Criminal Justice
Exposing Exploitation and Corruption
Covering the Climate Crisis
Investigating Murdered or Missing Persons
Indigenous Data Sovereignty
Getting Documents, Dealing with Whistleblowers, and Staying Safe

In conjunction with the introduction of this guide, a training/networking program is being held for Indigenous journalists from eight countries at the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Hamburg, Germany, September 26-29, 2019. This guide was written by GIJN Resource Center Director Toby McIntosh.

The Role of Investigative Journalism in Armenia’s Velvet Revolution

This year’s Armenian Revolution saw thousands take to the streets for almost two weeks to protest then-prime minister Serzh Sargsyan and his government. Journalists in the country say that it wasn’t one story that triggered the people’s ire against Sargsyan’s rule but the cumulative investigative coverage over the years.