Data Journalism Top 10: China’s Gene Data, Norway’s Terror, India’s Sugar, Space Tourism

Ten years ago, terror attacks in Norway claimed the lives of 77 people and seriously injured at least 40. Our NodeXL mapping from July 5 to 11 found an interactive timeline piece by Norwegian newspaper Verdens Gang telling the story of a tragic event that impacted an entire nation. In this edition, we also feature an investigation by Reuters into a Chinese company harvesting genetic data from pregnant women, a series on gun violence in Chicago by The Trace, and a look at “silent” Russian politicians by IStories.

Data Journalism Top 10: Hot Dogs, Ransomware, Earth’s Hottest Places, Miami Building Collapse, Bezos Empire

High vaccination rates in some parts of the world are helping to curb the spread of COVID-19 and allowing communities to resume normal life. But vaccinations can also give a false sense of security, with new variants threatening to prolong the pandemic. Our NodeXL mapping from June 28 to July 4, found Portuguese newspaper Público creating a tool to help readers find out what activities they can do after getting the vaccine at minimal risk. In this edition, we also take a look at a piece examining forest fires in Mexico, an analysis of the worst cyberattacks by Bloomberg, and a lively data-driven essay on same-gender lyrics by The Pudding.

Data Journalism Top 10: Chinese Propaganda, Social Media Abuse, Herd Immunity, Florida Condo Collapse, Pandemic Plastic

With less than a month until the start of the Olympic Games, host country Japan’s slow vaccination campaign is causing concern. Our NodeXL mapping from June 21 to 27 found a piece by The New York Times looking at Japan’s efforts to combat the pandemic in the run-up to a global sporting event. In this edition, we also feature a joint investigation by ProPublica and The New York Times into Chinese propaganda on the internet, a herd immunity calculator by German newspaper Zeit, and revelations from the Guardian about abusive posts on social media targeting English soccer players.

Data Journalism Top 10: Refugee Trails, Sri Lanka’s Eco-Disaster, Pandemic Poachers, German Voters, Sigma Awards

A sunken ship with a toxic cargo threatens to cause one of the worst environmental disasters in the history of Sri Lanka. Our NodeXL mapping from June 14 to 20 found a story by The Washington Post examining what caused the incident and evaluating the potential damage to marine wildlife. In this edition we also feature a piece by Al Jazeera evaluating 70 years of journeys made by refugees, an investigation into recyclable waste by Brazilian news outlet Metrópoles, and take a look at the winners of the 2021 Sigma Awards recognizing the best data journalism around the globe.

ProPublica illustration for The Secret IRS Files'

Data Journalism Top 10: Secret Tax Files, India’s Faltering Vaccines, Western Drought, Argentina’s News Deserts, The Gambia’s Toxic Water

Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from June 7 to 13, which tracks the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter each week, focused in on this major investigation by ProPublica, which offers an unprecedented look inside the financial lives of US billionaires. In this edition, we also feature a detailed look at India’s faltering vaccination campaign, a data project exploring Argentina’s news deserts, and an investigation of The Gambia’s water paradox.

Data Journalism Top 10: Deadly Russian Births, Pacific Mining Plunder, Toxic Dams, Cool Rocks, Extreme Rainfall, Analyzing Chess

Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from May 31 to June 6, which tracks the most popular data journalism stories on Twitter each week, found a project by the Guardian explaining who profits from the mass extraction of the region’s natural resources. In this edition, we also feature an investigation by IStories into maternal and infant mortality in Russia, a look into the toxic threat caused by aging dams in the US by Undark Magazine, and an analysis of wildlife trade in Southeast Asia by GIJN member Oxpeckers.

Data Journalism Top 10: Tulsa Race Massacre, Canada’s Prison Bias, Colombia’s Police Violence, Football’s Big Money, Europe’s Lobbyists, Battling Misinformation

For inmates in Canada, risk assessments can determine which type of prison they are sent to and their chances of successfully reentering society. But an investigation by The Globe and Mail revealed that these assessments are biased against Indigenous and Black inmates. Our NodeXL #ddj mapping from May 24 to 30 also found an interactive project by The New York Times recreating the Black neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma destroyed in 1921, and data-driven reporting on the influence of big money in soccer, the cost of Italy’s vaccination campaign, and police violence during the recent protests in Colombia.