How Journalists Can Detect Electronic Surveillance

Journalists who work in authoritarian environments tend to be under electronic surveillance. Sometimes surveillance is being conducted at a mass scale — rather than directed at a specific target — and is intended to track what journalists in general are doing and what stories they are investigating. Here’s how to assess if surveillance is a potential or actual risk to privacy, personal safety, data security and the identities of sources.

Women Journalists, Muslim Countries

Iranian journalist Yeganeh Rezaian confronts the difficulties women reporters face while working in Muslim countries in a paper for Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. In this excerpt, she writes about old-fashioned sexual harassment and the problem with interviewing other women.

Wi-Fi Can Be Dangerous: Three Ways To Avoid Getting Hacked

Fast Company last week brought home the issue of online privacy with a chilling piece on in-flight eavesdropping. It turns out that USA Today’s Steven Petrow, while working on a story on the Apple-FBI battle over iPhone access, “had been hacked mid-flight” over an American Airlines Wi-Fi system. A man seated behind him had read his emails as well as those of other passengers on the flight. The article doesn’t go into detail on how the man hacked into American’s Gogo Wi-Fi, but it’s not hard to guess what might have happened. More importantly, this incident is yet another wake-up call for being aware of this type of spying and to do something about it.