Does Your Newsroom Need a Product Manager?

In the midst of a slew of emerging newsroom titles, the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas is offering a free, four-week online product management for journalists course from October 16. Professor Cindy Royal talked to GIJN about the essential role many newsrooms didn’t even know they’d been missing.

Who’s Coming to Joburg?

Thinking of joining us at the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Johannesburg this November? You don’t want to miss this one. We’ve got Pulitzer Prize winners, data journalism pioneers, the brains behind the Panama Papers, and the smartest, toughest, most enterprising reporters on the planet.

West African Journalists Launch Investigative Hub

The April gathering in Ouagadougou marked the start of operational activities of the Norbert Zongo Cell for Investigative Journalism in West Africa, an investigative hub where journalists can access grants, resources, mentoring and form cross-border collaborations.

Looking for a Suicidal Job? Try Iraqi War Reporter

Divine intervention appears to be the only thing protecting journalists in Iraq these days. Local reporters are sent off to do conflict reporting with no prior training and equipped with bad, cheaply made and easily penetrable vests. Mustafa Sa’adoun, director of Iraqi Observatory for Human Rights, details the dangers of being an Iraqi war reporter.

Peer Reviewing Our Data Stories

As journalists who analyze data for stories, we strive to hold ourselves accountable to a high standard of accuracy. But checking our work is rarely a straightforward process. Newsroom editors and fact-checkers might not have enough data expertise. Often, we need an outside opinion. Ideally, we could ask each other for advice, or even turn to experts in other fields for help. In academia, asking for outside comment before publication is broadly referred to as “peer review.”

Global Conference, Global Network

As we gather for the second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference, this seems a good time to share again with our colleagues where the Global Investigative Journalism Network and its conferences come from. It was a simple idea at the end of the 20th century — to gather the world’s investigative journalists to share their knowledge with each other — that gave birth to GIJN, which has now grown to 138 member organizations in 62 countries.