A New Resource for Women Journalists

Women muckrakers are breaking important stories around the world, but there are still relatively few female investigative journalists. To help them find communities and support, GIJN has compiled a comprehensive list of global resources designed for women journalists.

Document of the Day: Algorithms for Journalists

Here’s a great place to start learning about how algorithms can enhance your work: A Columbia Journalism School professor has shared his course syllabus online, complete with exercises and examples of how algorithms have been used by journalists.

New for GIJN Members: Access to LexisNexis Research and Diligence Tools

The Global Investigative Journalism Network is pleased to announce that it is now offering its members an exclusive arrangement with leading global data and analytics company LexisNexis. GIJN members will now have access to one of the world’s largest electronic databases for legal and public records-related information, and for news and business information.

Document of the Day: Visual Vocabulary

Inspired by the Graphic Continuum by Jon Schwabish and Severino Ribeca, the Financial Times graphic team came up with their own neat chart of visualizations. The Visual Vocabulary is a guide to help journalists pick the right type of visualization for their story.

From the Experts: GIJN’s Daily Video Tips for Investigative Journalism

Starting today and running throughout the week for the next two months on GIJN’s YouTube channel — as well as on our main Facebook and Twitter platforms — our new, concise Tip of the Day format will feature leading experts who will share one critical insight each day, including investigative basics such as following public records or investigating with data, as well as how to better understand financial records and the latest online search strategies.

Document of the Day: Danske Bank’s Dirty Money

An internal report of Danske Bank, the largest financial institution in Denmark, found a series of “major deficiencies in controls and governance” that allowed $235 billion in questionable transactions to be made in its branch in Estonia.