Nils Mulvad: Data Journalism Is the Punk of Our Times

You couldn’t work as a journalist, if you were not able to do an interview. The same applies to data journalism in the age of digitization” – says Nils Mulvad, a world renowned data journalist, editor at Kaas & Mulvad and associate professor at The Danish School of Media and Journalism during the Data Harvest 2014 conference.

Investigative Apps: Useful Tools, if Rough on the Edges

There are a lot of websites out there that can help you find hidden information. But there are also software applications and browser plug-ins that can be of use to investigative journalists. Created by up-and-coming developers and enthusiasts on a budget, many of these programmes are rather unsophisticated, so don’t expect slick interfaces and 24-hour help desks. That said, if you can get past the jargon and rough-and-ready feel, you’ll find nifty little apps that can help you discover nuggets of information which would be unavailable through conventional means.

Covering the Money behind the Millennium Development Goals

There are the two essential questions a reporter covering business, the economy, or just about any topic should always ask: ‘How much does it cost?’ and ‘Where will you get the money from?’. These simple questions are not only key to gaining information about your current story’s topic, but they offer greater insight into reasons for decisions that have a direct impact on a country and its citizens.

Global Is Local, Local Is Global: Tips on Covering the Environment

The environment is the overarching issue of the 21st century for two reasons:
1. The environment includes and touches everything: air, water, food, health, climate, energy, development, poverty, economics—the list could go on without end.
2. Nearly every major environmental indicator is in decline.
We are pushing up against the limits of the Earth’s ability to support us. Climate change, biodiversity loss, and nitrogen pollution are moving toward crisis levels, according to recent studies. There is little public awareness of this reality, which means journalists covering the environment have a plethora of important stories to cover.

One Problem, Many Dimensions: Tips on Covering Poverty

There are many different concepts and definitions of poverty. According to the Oxford University Poverty and Human Development Initiative, ‘Poverty is often defined by one-dimensional measures, such as income. But no one indicator alone can capture the multiple aspects that constitute poverty. Multidimensional poverty is made up of several factors that constitute poor people’s experience of deprivation–such as poor health, lack of education, inadequate living standard, lack of income (as one of several factors considered), disempowerment, poor quality of work and threat from violence.’

Paper Trails: Following the Civil Rights Movement’s Records

Here, from 58 years ago this week, is the police report on Rosa Parks, the African-American woman who refused to move to the back of a public bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Her arrest helped spark the U.S. civil rights movement and began the end of apartheid in the American south. Thanks to historian Michael Beschloss for circulating this. And here’s one more record — a photograph — from that extraordinary time: three years later, also in Montgomery, Alabama, Dr. Martin Luther King getting arrested for “loitering.”

Global Conference: Call for Research Papers

The eighth Global Investigative Journalism Conference, to be held this October 12-15 in Rio de Janeiro, will feature for the first time an academic research track, highlighting trends, challenges, teaching methodologies, and best practices in investigative journalism.