Comment traquer les navires de commerce?

Anglais

Plus de 90 000 navires de commerce composent la marine marchande mondiale. Leur localisation est rigoureusement traquée, et les données ainsi amassées sont accessibles gratuitement. Le Réseau international de journalisme d’investigation (GIJN) a compilé une liste exhaustive des ressources permettant de traquer les navires (y compris les grands yachts et autres bateaux de pêche). Il est possible de connaître l’origine et la destination de chaque navire, et ce presque en temps réel. On peut également rechercher leurs propriétaires, obtenir des informations sur les navires et avoir accès à des photos de ces derniers.

The Toolbox: Digging for People, Trawling the Web and Keeping Yourself Safe

Effective digital investigative research relies heavily on gathering small pieces of information on a person or group and combining those to build a more comprehensive picture. Being able to find things like email addresses, usernames and sites with which they have accounts helps build out a profile that can be used for further investigation. GIJN’s Alastair Otter rounds up some tools worth checking out.

What the Experts Expect for Data Journalism in 2019

With the global spread of data journalism, the advent of artificial intelligence and the increasing use of big data moving alongside a rapid rise of disinformation, GIJN asked data journalism experts around the world what they anticipate for 2019. Here are their thoughts on the major trends, ideas and technologies that will affect how we do our jobs.

Document of the Day: Indicting Venezuela’s TV Mogul Belisario

We love indictments, and here’s one that caught our eye at GIJN: a recently unsealed document from the US Department of Justice last month, alleging that Venezuelan television mogul Raul Gorrin Belisario was part of a billion-dollar currency exchange and money laundering scheme that paid off high-level Venezuelan government officials. Belisario is no ordinary exile…

How They Did It: Digging up Zimbabwe’s Gukurahundi Massacre Dossier

Earlier this year, Botswana’s INK Centre for Investigative Journalism tracked down a dossier which detailed the heinous crimes of Gukurahundi — a series of massacres of civilians carried out by the Zimbabwe National Army in the 1980s — which had been kept under lock and key for decades. It was the first time the names of the deceased and blow-by-blow accounts of how the executions were carried out were made available to the public. INK’s Ntibinyane Ntibinyane writes for GIJN on how they did it.