How They Did It: Digging up Zimbabwe’s Gukurahundi Massacre Dossier

Earlier this year, Botswana’s INK Centre for Investigative Journalism tracked down a dossier which detailed the heinous crimes of Gukurahundi — a series of massacres of civilians carried out by the Zimbabwe National Army in the 1980s — which had been kept under lock and key for decades. It was the first time the names of the deceased and blow-by-blow accounts of how the executions were carried out were made available to the public. INK’s Ntibinyane Ntibinyane writes for GIJN on how they did it.

MOUs: How to Get Everyone on the Same Page for Collaborative Projects

As collaborative journalism becomes a common practice across the media industry, news outlets may need clear documentation to guide their projects. Drafting a memorandum of understanding between collaborating partners can help get everyone on the same page. Stefanie Murray, from the Center for Cooperative Media, gathered six MOU template examples as a guide.

How Satellite Imagery Became an Indispensable — and Easily Accessible — Tool for Journalists

Satellite imagery has become an indispensable tool in journalism, whether it’s for fact-finding or gauging the impact of a particular situation, reporting on climate events or understanding more about conflict zones, Geospatial tech wiz Anusuya Datta breaks down how satellite imagery has become an indispensable tool, sharing resources and providing guidelines for beginners.

8 Ways Journalists Visualized California’s Out-of-Control Wildfires

California officials and firefighters are becoming increasingly concerned that the drier, windier conditions spurred on by the warming climate will make wildfires more devastating and their seasons longer. But are enough people paying attention to their root causes and dire consequences? Here are eight ways US journalists have been chronicling this year’s wildfires.