Global Survey: Fact-Checking Sites Hit 75 Worldwide

The number of active fact-checking groups at news organizations and websites has now hit 75 worldwide, according to the Duke Reporters Lab (@ReportersLab). New fact-checking sites are now at work in Brazil, Morocco, Nepal, Spain, and the United States. Most sites specialize in verifying what politicians tell their constituents. Turnover is high: the report also notes that 43 fact-checking operations are now inactive.


Posted on: October 21, 2015

Fact-Checking Goes Global

Since 2010, scores of fact-checking Web sites have sprung up across the world. This week, fact checkers from six continents and more than 20 countries, including Argentina, Australia, Chile, Egypt, India, Italy, Serbia, South Africa and Ukraine, gathered for the first time in London to exchange ideas and assess the state of the fact-checking movement.

Source: The Washington Post

Posted on: June 15, 2014

Nonpartisan Fact-Checking Group Takes South Africa

Julian Rademeyer, a veteran investigative journalist, is the southern Africa editor of Africa Check, a Web site that is attempting to bring journalistic fact-checking to South Africa. There is a long history of courageous and sophisticated journalism in that part of the world. But until now, there has been nothing like the kind of nonpartisan fact-checking initiatives that have become so prominent in the US.

Source: New York Times

Posted on: July 29, 2013

Journalist’s Toolbox

The Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) has updated its Journalist’s Toolbox resource page. Although many are US-centric, there are lots of tools with a more global approach. The list includes good resources from mobile journalism, and public records to fact-checking social media.

Source: Society of Professional Journalists

Posted on: July 23, 2013