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Panama Papers Showcase Power of a Global Movement

The ongoing and spectacular investigation “Panama Papers” represents the culmination of a significant shift in the way journalism is now practiced. The project also represents 40 years of work done by groups of investigative reporters to bring the profession into the 21st Century. “The Panama Papers showcases not so much technological power but the power of the global investigative reporting movement,” says Sheila Coronel of the Columbia Journalism School.

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Against the Odds, Investigative Journalism Persists in Middle East

In the past year, a group of Arab journalists has been working secretly in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Algeria, and Yemen as part of a global network of investigative reporters mining the so called “Panama Papers.” They found that some Arab strongmen and their business partners are linked to offshore companies and bank accounts. What’s astonishing about this story is not that Arab dictators are going offshore to hide their wealth and evade sanctions. It’s that a community of Arab journalists is continuing to do investigative reporting in a region where there is increasingly little tolerance for accountability of any kind.

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Spotlight’s Robinson To Keynote Asia IJ Conference

GIJN and its partners are excited to officially open registration for Uncovering Asia — the second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference, to be held in Kathmandu, Nepal, on Sept. 23-25. Our keynote speaker will be Walter “Robby” Robinson, who led the Boston Globe Spotlight team’s Pulitzer Prize winning investigation into the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal. Robinson was played by actor Michael Keaton in the movie Spotlight.

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Teaching Data Journalism: A Survey & Model Curricula

Data journalism is thriving worldwide, but is American journalism education keeping up? Funded by the Knight Foundation, our research team set out to survey and analyze the state of data journalism education in the U.S. today. The results are being published and available online as a free report, Teaching Data and Computational Journalism, that provides model curricula for a range of computational and data journalism courses.

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GIJN Boosts Broadcast Journalists in Thailand

GIJN lent a hand to the Thai Broadcast Journalists Association last month, helping train 60 journalists in the fine art of muckraking in Thailand. “The ending workshop was quite amazing,” Hanson says. “They worked with an intensity that was really impressive, developing story ideas they had generated the first day… “I believe some of these stories will be published!”

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Wi-Fi Can Be Dangerous: Three Ways To Avoid Getting Hacked

Fast Company last week brought home the issue of online privacy with a chilling piece on in-flight eavesdropping. It turns out that USA Today’s Steven Petrow, while working on a story on the Apple-FBI battle over iPhone access, “had been hacked mid-flight” over an American Airlines Wi-Fi system. A man seated behind him had read his emails as well as those of other passengers on the flight. The article doesn’t go into detail on how the man hacked into American’s Gogo Wi-Fi, but it’s not hard to guess what might have happened. More importantly, this incident is yet another wake-up call for being aware of this type of spying and to do something about it.

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Despite Challenges, S. African Muckraking Pushes Forward

A boom in investigative journalism in South Africa seems to be winding down as media houses slash budgets to balance their books to continue to pay dividends to shareholders. “South Africa has had something of a golden era in investigative reporting, with as many as four teams at different institutions dedicated to it,” said Professor Anton Harber, head of the journalism department at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg.